Bass players unite

project made by 

 

Julie Pavlova and

Kathy Loran

 

Part III

Satoshi Ichiyangi, the US

(Rebel Hotel)

 

Satoshi Ichiyangi1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I started playing bass when I was 17 years old. Actually it wasn’t easy to play bass first one year. Even now sometime.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
It’s lifestyle. Also it always brings me something special.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
Duff Mackagan and Billy Sheehan.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
I play guitar sometime. I would like to learn piano if I start to play other instruments.

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
I’m only interested in playing with rock band.

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I’m in the band call Rebel Hotel. This band has great energy, feeling, attitude, ofcours great music. We having show on 27th Saturday night at tiki bar in Costa Mesa, and October 4th at whiskey blu. This one is our singer Ricky and my birthday bash.

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
Energy I don’t know about 2nd question. That should be said by people around me.

8. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
I love fishing. I can’t imagine my life without bass guitar.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
I love fender bass. It’s both.

10. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you?
My dream is make albums with Rebel Hotel and tour to all over the world.

Satoshi Ichiyangi2

Marco „Don Privacy” Valerio, the US

(EXILIA)

 

Marco - Don Privacy - Valerio 1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
Since I was a kid I had been captured by “that sound”, digging the bassline of any song I heard. I could start playing only at 17, and it felt very easy and familiar on the first years. Then, the deeper you want to go into details and understanding, the more work you need to be satisfied by your own musicianship.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
It’s a life supply.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
John Paul Jones, TM Stevens, Bobby Vega, Francis Rocco Prestia, Flea, Cass Lewis, Marcus Miller, Tim Commerford, Les Claypool, Mick Karn. And I would say Greg Phillinganes as a keyboard-bass player. These one inspired me for different reasons, but they’re not necessarily my favorites ones. It’s a different thing.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?No I don’t, just some chords and basic stuff on guitar. I’m a regular “air drummer”, so I guess I should start that (laughs)

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
Well, I don’t know… I would love to be associated to a Korg MS-10.

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I play in EXILIA since 2007. The band came out in 2002 on a major label deal, then we chose to be independent, but we kept on touring all over Europe and USA, and released 6 albums. Our ever-growing fan base is really loyal and supportive, and the next album is coming out in some months. I am very grateful to be a part of this project and most important, I really love the songs I play!! Go and check www.exiliamusic.comMarco - Don Privacy - Valerio2

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
The live performance is a moment of bliss, it’s sublime. That moment is almost the reason I put all of my work and energy for. I always give my best to be 100% friendly and open with fans: without them, no band would exist.

8. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
Of course I do: I got also a degree in Physiotherapy and Water Therapies. Helping sick or disabled people recover gives a higher purpose to your life, the lessons you learn from them and their gratitude are priceless. Water is surely my natural element, and my favorite one on a metaphorical side, so I love anything related: swimming, diving, surfing, sailing, travelling seaside, etc.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
Obviously the “quality of music” is not about any instrument’s brand. To be accurate, talking about brands is misleading: there are good or bad single instruments, to be checked with your own hands and ears. Anyway, I’m generally a Leo-Fender-guy, so I love old MMs and G&Ls too. But I had the chance to check many different basses from different brands, and a lot of them were somehow great.

10. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you?
Same answer for all three questions: to create and play wonderful music, and to perform that music around the world as much as possible.

Elysa F-c, the US

(Beyond Shadows, Deepest Sleep)

 

Elysa F-c1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I started playing bass the Summer before I began High school Was it easy for you to learn bass? Well, I had been playing the violin in school, so I had some background knowledge of 4-stringed instruments. I did originally want to play the drums, but since I was living in an apartment building at the time that wasn’t possible, since I had neighbors…so I compromised and took the next closest thing to a rhythm instrument that someone would play in a band…I taught myself the bass guitar, so it took me a long time to actually build my skills, but I spent hours every day after high school learning different songs and eventually it got easier.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
Bass for me at the moment is a hobby, there was a time I hoped it could become more, and maybe it still can, but at the moment I am working on other areas of my career.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
There are so many! Growing up, I was really into Justin Chancellor from Tool and Chi Cheng from the Deftones, D’arcy from the Smashing Pumpkins, Kim Deal from the Pixies and Breeders, Chris Squire from YES, Geezer Butler from Black Sabbath, Paul McCartney, Ellie Erickson from Erase Errata….the list could go on!

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
I’d love to play cello and/or tablas as my next instruments if I ever have the chance to learn new ones…and I would still like to learn to play the drums one day

5. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I am unfortunately not collaborating with anyone at the moment, but in the past I have been involved in many different projects including Beyond Shadows, a melodic death metal band, and In Deepest Sleep, a progressive rock all female band.

6. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
I absolutely love playing live….I don’t know if I will ever lose the nerves that come along with playing live, but for me playing live is exciting and I just love sharing music I believe in with other people. Every fan to me is an honor and I love hearing feedback from others about the music I am playing and to know people are enjoying the music I’m making is the best; there’s nothing without the fans!

7. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
Aside from music, I enjoy spending time with my family, particularly my wife and cats. I am very much in other areas of my life right now, I am currently a Social Worker/Program Manger at a community center and that is another huge piece of my life. Even through music, I was always interested in being able to bring people together and promote social justice, so I am happy to have a job in another area that allows me to do that as well.

8. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
My favorite bass is a customized (due to an unfortunate incident where the headstock broke many years ago) Andreas Shark 5-string bass, so it was already a relatively obscure brand that now has a complete different neck than the original bass. I do also like Ibanez, which was my original bass, and some other brands, but this is the one that has stuck with me. I think it’s good to start out with something that fits your hands comfortably in terms of neck size, etc., and then the skill will come with lots of dedication and practice. People always say playing bass is easy, and I always responded to say that being GOOD at bass is not. Of course it is nice to be able to have great high end equipment, but it is really about the dedication and passion of the player themselves I believe that makes the music sound good.

9. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you?
As for the future, I am definitely looking to get back into playing music. I want to just have a good time with some like minded people, create some songs and play shows locally.

Tom Bielek, the US

(Rivet, EOE)

Tom Bielek

Photo credit Jack Lue

1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
When I was about 11 years old I picked it up because it looked like fun and easy. It wasn’t easy because I wasn’t very coordinated, but I stuck to practicing it every day for hours until I became comfortable with it.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
It’s a hobby that I want to eventually become a job and lifestyle.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
My influence initially came from professionals like Flea and Jack Bruce, but my sole inspiration came from my uncle Steve Bielek. He is a natural bass player and executes the best bass lines so effortlessly. I’m truly honored to have learned under him.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
I attempt to play whatever instrument I pick up, but I have the most confidence with the bass. Classical guitar would be my next choice.

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
Bass guitar

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I’ve been with Rivet (Los Angeles, CA) for about 2 ½ years. Also I still play some reunion shows with a band, I founded with some friends back in 1992, called EOE (Pittsburgh, PA)

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
The rush I get from performing live is the reason I continue to play. My bass becomes a way for me to execute every note as if it were my last. I am very friendly and open with my fans. I enjoy meeting people and learning what I can from them. It allows me to create memories and connect with them on a deeper level.

8. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
I like traveling and learning about other cultures. Also I really enjoy learning how things are made. I feel like I can do almost anything because I am a very driven person with ambitions and goals. My current career in import / export manufacturing fills the needs I have outside of music.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
I currently use a Korean Spector 5 String bass because it gives me the sound I need, its tough, and comfortable for my active playing. The quality of music depends both on the equipment and the skill of the player. The bass pickup setup, feel of the neck, and weight of the bass all play an important role in the playability and sound. I use a Gallien Krueger amp and cabinets to get the necessary depth and versatility needed. My style is not technical, but can learn anything. If I hear a challenging bass line I like, I often learn it just for fun. Most of my training was by ear and watching techniques of players I respected.

10. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you? 
The current plan is to be progressive in all aspects of the band. We released a record recently and continue to grow our local following. We are receiving better performance opportunities and expanding to other regions. My dream and overall goal is to drive my music career to the point where it pays me more than my current job and becomes my main source of income, and also to be known in history as one of the great performers of our time. I would like others to wish me success in achieving my goals, good health, and a long life.

Teresa Cowles, the US

 

Teresa Cowles1. When did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I started playing in my mid 20s. I was dating a musician at the time and I asked him to teach me to play guitar. I had played piano as a kid and am generally musical but had never played guitar before. When he noticed that I only wanted to play melodies and not chords he handed me a bass instead. It was not a hard instrument for me to learn. I learned to play by playing along to my favorite records then I was playing in a band within 2 months of picking up the instrument.

2. Playing on the bass for you is Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
Playing bass is one of the things I do to make my living so it is sometimes a job, but it is also sometimes a hobby (I don’t always get paid) and definitely a lifestyle.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
I admire the playing of many people. The first bassline I ever learned was from David J (Bauhaus, the song was Kick in the Eye). I actually played a gig that he was on the bill for several years ago and got to tell him that. I’m not sure he was very impressed. I also really admire Carol Kaye, a pioneer female bass player who played on countless songs in the 60s and 70s as part of a group of LA musicians known as the Wrecking Crew. I had the honor of getting to portray her in a biopic about Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys that’s coming out at the end of this year called “Love and Mercy.” She was kind enough to Skype with me and give me a few impromptu bass lessons so that I could play the way she played (a particular technique with a pic)k for the movie. Very nice lady and still plays and teaches bass and guitar to this day.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
I sometimes play percussion and sing backup in bands. I also play a little piano. I would love to relearn the piano and get better at it.

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is?
Bass andharmony vocals

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate.
I have played with many bands and songwriters over the years. I currently work with Ben Vaughn, Evie Sands, Adam Marsland, JasonBerk, Anny Celsi, Wormstew, EZ-Tiger and The Resonant Heads. I also recently played a show with Brian Wilson and his band.

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
During live performances I really get into the music and don’t interact a lot directly with the audience but I do feed off their energy. I used to interact more when I fronted my own band but not being the front person makes it easier to do your own thing and not worry as much about engaging the audience.

8. What do you like besides music?Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
I am a massage therapist as well as a bass player so I enjoy working on people and helping them manage pain and relaxation. If I were not doing music or massage I could imagine having a job where I traveled a lot or maybe worked with kids or animals.

9. Maybe other bass players for those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or the skill of the bass player?
I really like Fender P-basses and I have 2. A 2005 American P bass strung with round wound strings is the workhorse bass I record with most often. Live lately I’ve been mostly playing a late 80s Japanese 63 reissue P bass with flat wound strings. I also have a Danelectro DC that I use if I need a trashier sound. I usually keep it tuned down half a step. I have an acoustic bass I use mostly for rehearsing at home and an Ibanez and Fender Squire P that I keep mostly to loan out to people’s kids who want to learn to play bass. I think the quality of the instrument is important but a good player can make anything sound decent.

10. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you?
I am hoping to do more recording touring in the future and play more high profile shows. I would love to tour a few months a year and then play around LA with people I like and respect and do massage the rest of the time. That’s my perfect world.

Matt Ferrari, the US

(Three Act Tragedy)

 

Matt Ferrari1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I started playing bass when I was 15, and it was my first time even dabbling in playing an instrument, so it was as hard as anything is or isn’t for a teenager to learn, I suppose. I loved it, but my approach to learning was… non-conventional, so to speak.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
Lifestyle, definitely lifestyle. I’ve always said the bass feels more like an extension of myself instead of a tool of sorts.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
My original inspiration was Les Claypool of Primus, and Justin Chancellor of Tool. Although these played a heavy roll in my early endeavors into creative from the perspective a bass player, I have grow to appreciate and be influenced by most if not all genres of music and their respective cream of the crop players.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
I dabble in almost every instrument I can put my hands on. I’m also a Producer/Engineer, so in mine line of work you wind up tinkering a lot. I’d like to get properly acquainted with the piano. I have a vintage one in the studio that I love, but I almost feel embarrassed to play on due to my lack of piano fingers.

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
Primarily bass and production. I don’t play any other instrument well enough to call it my own, but I can play it well enough to turn it into something in the studio for sure!

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
Currently my full time band is Three Act Tragedy, which is a melodic rock/metal band. The music is aggressive at times with melodic female vocals for the lead. No screaming in this one, which is in sharp contrast to previous projects I’ve been involved in.

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
Live performances are when I feel truly alive, and at home. On the stage playing bass is where I belong!

8. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
Most of my life revolves around music in some facet or another. If I’m not working on music, or working at my many music related jobs, I’m usually going to shows. The small gaps in between are spent playing video games, and bbqing with my friends.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
I used to have a lot of brand preference going on in my head when I started out. I recommend taking someone with you. Where a blindfold on the way in, and have them go down the row handing you bass after bass while you play (still blind folded). The brand, make, model and year mean nothing. If it feels, and sounds good to your ears that is your instrument… it’s just s that a lot of times your ears have pricey taste.

10. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you?
On a professional level I am planning to push Three Act Tragedy really hard, and promote my studio/record label, Psycho Monkey Records. On a personal level… I’m hoping to achieve sleep sometime soon. So hard to come by… so very hard to come by.

Marko Dta, the US

(Downtown Attraction)

 

Marko Dta1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I started playing bass guitar around 4 years ago when me and my friend Matti Jade decided to create the band i’m in right now, Downtown Attraction. Before that i was a guitar player for almost 10 years. The transaction from one instrument to the other wasn’t too traumatic for me. The only thing with bass guitar is that you really need to focus your attention on the drums. Drums and bass need to be the same instrument… You can’t mess that up.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
Playing the bass for me is… Everything. I am lucky enough to play in a band with a lot of talented people and me, like all my band members, are very focus and ambitious to make this big love in music that we have into a career. Almost 1 year ago we got a record deal from this L.A. Record label and now we are doing a record with the producer Mike Clink (Guns n Roses, Metallica etc.). We feel very blessed to be able to work with people with so much talent and experience.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
I am a heavy rock/ punk rock kid. I love heavy bass players like Duff Mckagan, Twiggy from the Marilyn Manson, Rex Brown from Pantera…and I have always been a big FLEA fan (who isn’t?!). The heavier the better for me…But don’t forget the melody!

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
Like I already said, before being in DOWNTOWN ATTRACTION i was playing guitar in a couple of different bands. When I was 8 I took Piano lessons as well. I think I did that for 2 years. To be honest with you if I had time to learn another instrument I would start playing Piano again. Piano to me is an amazing instrument and there is soooo much you can do with it. It has an amazing sound, very full but still very warm. I was always in love with it

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
Bass guitar & electric guitar.

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I play bass guitar in Downtown Attraction. We are a Los Angeles based Band. We love to be as heavy and fast as possible… Without forgetting about melodies and big choruses. We don’t care about what people think about us. We like to be in your face. It’s a very simple concept.

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
Live performances are the main part of every Rock N Roll band. PERIOD. To me being on stage and able to put all your energy and frustration out AND at the same time being able to share all these feelings with your own fans is PRICELESS. Live performances can be very intimate sometimes. About our fans I try to be as close as possible to them. I always try to answer their questions about the band and/or the shows that we have. Time is tight sometimes but you gotta do your best to create a good relationship with your followers.

Marko Dta28. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
Well being a big Arnold Schwarzenegger Fan yes I do! I don’t think that in all my life Music will be the only think I will be doing. Definitely it will always be my biggest love and i do not deny that. But I am really into fitness too so I wouldn’t mind doing something related to that in the future… We’ll see.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
Well that’s a great question Julie. I use an homemade prototype ALUMINUM bass guitar called „normandy”. They are made in Salem, Oregon and they really are amazing instruments. But I really believe that the way you are playing does 90% of the job. Think about old guitar blues players… Old shitty guitars but soo much soul and talent.

10. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future? What are you dreaming about? What should we wish for you?
My plans for the future is finishing my album(it should be done by December 2014 and be released by the first quarter of 2015) and go on tour. My one wish is being one of the biggest rock n roll band ever stepped on a stage. No joke

Ted Russel Kamp, the US

(Shooter Jennings, Calico, Wanda Jackson, James Intveld, James Byous, Chase Cohl, Peach and Knife, the Cherry Bluestorms and Funkyjenn)

Ted Russel Kamp

1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I started playing bass when I was 13 in my first year of High School. I loved it right away and played all the time so it was pretty easy for me to start playing. I had played trumpet in school bands since the 4th grade so I already understood scales and reading which definitely helped.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
I have been a professional musician for almost 20 years now so the bass/music is my job and lifestyle and still is my hobby too. It’s always been fascinating to me how you choose your instrument but it kind of chooses you too. Whenever a band meets another band on the road, the drummers always hit it off, the bass players hit it off, the lead singers end up hanging out together … it’s not just talking about gear, but has more to do with the personality types we have and the roles we have chosen in life.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
Paul McCartney, Jamey Jamerson, Carl Radle, Leland Sklar, Duck Dunn, Carol Kaye, Sting, Kenny Gradney, Ray Brown, Scott Lefaro, Ron Carter … too many to name. Doug Miller is a great jazz player in Seattle I used to study with. Taras Produniak is an amazing player in L.A. I look up to. George Reiff is another out of Austin.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
Yes, I play guitar and dobro, some keyboards and trumpet and trombone but bass and singing are my main things. I have been messing around with the harmonica recently. I’m at the cool simple and out of tune Neil Young level now but I’d like to get better at crossharp bluesy playing/

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
Bass all the way.

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I have my own solo project. Sometimes I gig and tour solo. Sometimes I hire a band to play with me when I travel. I also play a lot locally in L.A. and do some touring with other artists. Some of my favorite people I have been playing with are: Shooter Jennings, Calico, Wanda Jackson, James Intveld, James Byous, Chase Cohl, Peach and Knife, the Cherry Bluestorms and Funkyjenn.

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
I love playing live and do it many times every week. It is not uncommon for me to have 5 or 6 gigs a week. In fact, next week I leave for a 3 week solo tour in Europe – it’ll be 19 shows in 21 days in Holland, Germany, Sweden and Finland. Also, I love meeting audiences and music lovers and talking about music. Our mutual love of music makes for a lot of inspiring conversation and turns me on to a lot of great new music too – and without the fans, we wouldn’t have a job, so it’s never been too hard for me to talk to the fans and people in the audience.

8. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
All I really do is play music and spend time with my family. That’s the way I like it. I do try to make time to read and watch old movies.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
I think every instrument has it’s own personality just like every person does. So there is not an ideal brand or kind of instrument, there is just what suits you. There are definitely higher quality instruments though, so once you get to the range of pretty good instruments, anything can work as long as you are comfortable on it. But if you have something to say, you can say it with even the cheapest level of gear. A great singer can sing through any microphone and still sound like themself. Players and instruments are the same. Some of my favorite basses I have are: Fender P-Bass (I have a 1983 Elite PBass which is the first bass I ever owned and I still play it a lot), Fender Jazz Bass, Gibson Thunderbird, Epiphone Jack Casady, Danelectro Longhorn, a cool old Crown (it’s a Japanese Hofner copy from the 60’s and it has a great pillowy warm sound). I also have an upright acoustic bass I play a lot which is a German made Gutz from the 50’s that I bought in Seattle about 20 years ago.

10. And the last question is about your musical dreams and plans. What are you planning for the future?
I am working on my next solo record which I am hoping to release next Spring or Summer. I also play a lot of local gigs in L.A. both with my band and as a sideman for other artists. I have been producing more records for other artists and band that I have been playing with and have been loving that too.

Zachary Kibbee, the US

 

Zachary Kibbee1. For the first question we want to know when did you start to play the bass guitar? Was it easy for you to learn bass?
I first picked up a bass when I was 14. It was my friends and he didn’t like playing very much. It seemed to just make sense to me and I felt very comfortable playing the instrument. I found myself writing music within days of getting my own bass.

2. Playing on the bass for you is… Hobby? Job? Lifestyle?
I am fortunate that playing music, not just bass, has become my profession. My music is used a lot in television and film.

3. Who is your musical inspiration among bassists?
Flea has been my biggest influence musically as a bass player. I used to even study videos of him with the Chili Peppers so I could look like him and act like him on the stage. I’m also fond of John Paul Jones and Paul McCartney who, I believe to be one of the most underrated bassist of all time.

4. Do you play any other musical instruments? If you start to learn another one which would you like?
I play guitar, ukulele, drums, piano, harmonica, and I sing. I’ve found that most bass players pick up other instruments as well.

5. Musical instrument with which you can be associated with is…
I play a rare style Green wood – washed Fender American Deluxe P/J – Bass with active pickups.

6. Tell us about the projects in which you participate?
I’m currently working on a few projects. I have a solo project under my name Zachary Kibbee where I play guitar and sing, as well as recording project with my producer Joseph Holiday called Olde Future where I play bass and guitar as well as a few other instruments and sing.

7. What do you feel on live performances? How friendly and open are you with your fans?
I live performing. I am happy and fun on stage. I like to interact with my fans.

8. What do you like except music? Can you imagine yourself in other areas of life?
When I was younger I wanted to be an architect. I’ve always liked building things and figuring out puzzles and making things work. I think that’s helped me a lot as a song writer.

9. Maybe other bass players or those who start to learn bass are reading this article now. Let’s talk about technical stuff. Which brand do you prefer? Does quality of music depend on the guitar’s brand or of the skill of the bass player?
They say a good player can play on any instrument. While that may be true, it is a lot easier to play on a well built instrument. As far as learning to play, my advice is to just learn songs. Learn songs you like, learn them note for note, don’t be lazy about how you learn.